CHANGING TIMES. CHANGING SCIENCE.

It is a fact that people are living longer than ever before, yet the number suffering with chronic illnesses like diabetes and cardiovascular disease is increasing. In the last twenty years, changes in the modern world such as urbanization, improvement in the standard of living, access to food and health services, and even the Internet, have had serious health consequences. People's lives require less physical activity. Good dietary habits are declining.

CHANGING TIMES. CHANGING SCIENCE.

Worldwide, millions of adults and children are suffering from obesity, a condition that seriously affects both health and quality of life. Chronic diseases are beginning earlier, often with origins in infancy and childhood.

The development and progression of these conditions are strongly influenced by metabolic effects. Metabolism is the process by which cells produce and consume energy that sustains life. Metabolic processes reflect lifestyle factors including diet, activity, and a host of other contributing factors. These interrelated factors are an important focus of the scientists at Pennington Biomedical.